The Deception of Superiority 

I recently read a quote online in which an individual stated, “I refuse to say please to someone beneath me.” Now, I could be wrong, but it’s doubtful this person is a doctor, CEO, or someone of seemingly great importance. More likely he is some average individual who is great in his own eyes. Regardless, his statement reveals how shallow he is.

Many strive to be great, some even see themselves as gods, but in the end each of us dies. In truth, there is no advantage being buried in a tomb over a casket or a casket over a plastic bag. However we are laid to rest, our bodies are dead—then we must give account for our lives (Heb. 9:27).

What exactly makes a person “inferior” to another? Poverty, lack of education, skin color, nationality, or lack of attractiveness? Does being a doctor, lawyer, politician, athlete, or movie star really make a person superior to the janitor, waitress, clerk, fuel station attendant, or housekeeper? Now, it’s easy to quickly answer with “no, of course not,” but I’ve observed such arrogance in churches and Bible colleges/seminaries as anywhere else. It’s not for no reason Paul noted in one of his letters, “knowledge puffs up” (1 Cor. 8:1), and addressed divisions, schisms, pride, and those who were “spiritual” and those who were not. But again, what makes a person “beneath” another? What makes another “unworthy” of respect and common courtesy? What makes anyone so high and mighty that it’s beneath them to say, “please,” “thank you,” “good morning,” or a polite “excuse me”?

When the Titanic was sinking, riches, charm, influence, skill, intelligence, and good looks didn’t benefit anyone. People boast about so much crap that’s here today and gone tomorrow. Those who are so cool and attractive now, their bodies  will one day join the rest of humanity in becoming dust, nothing more than the manure and dirt in the fields. Each of us will stand before our Creator and become aware in the fullest measure as to how pitifully insignificant we really are—but by His grace. With whatever measure of kindness or rudeness, mercy or contempt we’ve dished out to others will be measured back to us (Matt. 7:2).

God’s standards are so radically different than the world’s. The world is so impressed by the trivial, temporal, fleeting, and worthless. In the eyes of God, our careers, nice houses, good looks, and empires of dirt don’t mean much. Rather, “but only [in Christ] faith working through love” (Gal. 5:6).

The Scriptures admonish us with the following:

Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly. Never be wise in your own sight. ~ Romans 12:16

For if anyone thinks he is something, when he is nothing, he deceives himself. ~ Galatians 6:3

If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. ~ 1 Corinthians 13:1-2

But God said to him, “Fool! This night your soul is required of you, and the things you have prepared, whose will they be?” So is the one who lays up treasure for himself and is not rich toward God.” ~ Luke 12:20-21

Whatever Happened to Love Songs?

I admit, I wasn’t big into love songs growing up. However, as I’ve gotten older I’ve come to really appreciate them. Mind you, I know the lifestyles of many of the musicians of my generation were not puritanical—far from. Still, there was a recognition of love and commitment. Whatever happened to love songs—songs about cherishing, valuing, and being committed to another? Consider some of the following lines:

“I meant every word I said when I said that I loved you I meant that I loved you forever.” ~ Keep On Loving You by REO Speedwagon

“Love me tomorrow like today, love me tomorrow, hurry back, can’t you see I need you much more than yesterday?” ~ Love Me Tomorrow by Chicago

“I will always love you, I would never leave you alone … I am a man who will fight for your honor.” ~ Glory of Love by Peter Cetera

“You came along and stole my heart when you entered my life. Ooh, babe, you got what it takes, so I made you my wife. Since then I never looked back. It’s almost like living a dream. And, oooh, I love you.” ~ I Love You by Climax Blues Band

“You are so beautiful to me, can’t  you see? You’re everything I hoped for, you’re everything I need. You are so beautiful to me.” ~ You Are So Beautiful by Joe Cocker

“I just called to say I love you. I just called to say I care. ~ I Just Called to Say I Love You by Stevie Wonder

“When my soul was in the lost and found, you came along to claim it … You make me feel like a natural woman.” ~ A Natural Woman by Aretha Franklin

Today’s love songs are often “break-up” songs. What’s worse is the fact many songs are simply about getting in the sack with someone then leaving without any commitment. Worse still are raunchy songs using derogatory terms in reference to women. Still, not long ago a controversial song came out by a women who sang about the condition of her crotch (to put it mildly).

Our society bemoans the fact it’s breaking down. But what should we expect when so many ridicule—and even scorn—devotion, faithfulness, and commitment? Why should there be surprise when people—especially girls—are viewed not as persons but  objects, or when guys aren’t respected if they’re “nice guys” who have standards, or children are viewed as mistakes and inconveniences?

Emotionally healthy families, love, faithfulness, and fidelity makes stronger and healthier communities, but to neglect these vital elements certainly erodes the foundation and stability of any society.

Let not steadfast love and faithfulness forsake you; bind them around your neck; write them on the tablet of your heart. So you will find favor and good success in the sight of God and man. ~ Proverbs 3:3-4

Whoever despises his neighbor is a sinner, but blessed is he who is generous to the poor. Do they not go astray who devise evil? Those who devise good meet steadfast love and faithfulness. ~ Proverbs 14:21-22

Like Chipped and Broken Shells

I was recently on one of Florida’s beaches enjoying the sound of the waves and talking with the Lord. As I walked along the shore I was looking for some nice shells (our bathrooms are beach themed). There were thousands—perhaps millions—of different shells of different sizes, designs, and colors. 

Along the beach there were collections of shells lying together having been washed up by the tides. While still maintaining some of their natural beauty, many of the shells had chips or holes. Some shells were broken in half, left ignored and forgotten. 

I couldn’t help but think of the similarities between these shells and people. How many of us have lost some of our luster? How many of us are chipped, ridden with holes, or just plain broken—swept up and left to be forgotten? Yet we are not completely void of our natural beauty. Furthermore, we are redeemable! For this reason Christ died for us.

In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace. ~ Ephesians 1:7

It is true that sin, guilt, shame, and failure can break us. Furthermore, some fall and will never recapture what they once had. Consequences are a reality. Folly, pride, and rebellion come with a price. Still, if we were good and pristine, then we wouldn’t need a Savior. However, none of us is truly good or pristine. 

Friend, I don’t know your story, but maybe you feel like one of those broken shells. Maybe you’ve been dealt a difficult hand. Perhaps you’ve made some poor choices that caused you to lose it all. Maybe you once walked with the Lord but fell away, and now you think He has no place for you. Or maybe you struggle with a besetting sin and just feel as if the devil is always going to have the upper hand. Friend, you are simply a prayer away from the loving presence of God.

Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved. ~ Romans 10:13

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. ~ 1 John 1:9

How tragic when persons come to a point when they feel they have absolutely nothing worthwhile to give. Strangely, in our brokenness we sometimes have more to give—because of grace. Brokenness can, indeed, remain as worthless brokenness. However, in Christ one’s brokenness can be redemptive. Brokenness can develop compassion and empathy. Grace can guide a person to give a warm smile, a word of encouragement, or needed truth in the right time. Brokenness can develop humility that is willing to associate with the lowly and to help the downtrodden. And if brokenness does not leave one embittered, genuine love can begin to grow in a world where love is so needed.

Friend, perhaps you recognize you are like a chipped, broken, and hole-ridden shell. It might be difficult to see, but there still remains a measure of dignity and image of God. In and through Christ, these can be renewed. In Christ, no man or woman remains like a chipped and broken shell. 

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come. All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation. ~ 2 Corinthians 5:17-18

My Best Friend and Our Anchor

As I write this, my wife and I are celebrating another wedding anniversary. Marriage is not always easy. It consists of two imperfect persons having different strengths, weaknesses, and temperaments together facing various—and sometimes unexpected—situations and trials.

Before giving my wife her card and a couple small gifts, I pulled up on my phone, “You’re My Best Friend,” by Queen. Some of the lines in the song are, “Ooh, you make me live, whatever this world can give to me,” “In rain or shine, you’ve stood by me girl,” “Ooh, you make me live whenever this world is cruel to me I got you to help me forgive,” “Oh, you’re the first one when things turn out bad, you know I’ll never be lonely,” and “I’m happy, happy at home, you’re my best friend.” These words are descriptive of my wife. She has stood by me through some really difficult times.

Yet, we also have the Lord to give thanks to. Again, marriage is not easy. In fact, there are times it can be extremely difficult. In life, faith, and marriage, we have this hope and promise:

We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner place behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest forever after the order of Melchizedek. ~ Hebrews 6:19-20

Aside from any opinions of Ray Boltz (or Queen, for that matter), there is still truth in the words to his song, “The Anchor Holds.” 

“The anchor holds / Though the ship is battered / The anchor holds / Though the sails are torn / I have fallen on my knees / As I faced the raging seas / The anchor holds / In spite of the storm.”

There are times when storms seem to thrash us around and hope begins to seem dashed on the rocks. But through prayer, an anchor that holds, and commitment, we are still together. We’re still going to have bad days and get on each other’s nerves, and there are still more storms to come. But my wife is my best friend, and Jesus Christ is our anchor of hope. 

Has God Permitted a Lying Spirit? 

Recently, I posted an article entitled,  “The Necessity of Prayer,” which was an adaptation of a message I shared at a men’s breakfast. After I finished, a pastor mentioned how the message was both needed and timely. He noted how our nation is in big trouble and proceeded to say something that sent shivers down my spine. He wondered if God has sent a lying spirit to spread its deception across America and if we have crossed a point of no return or recovery.

This might sound strange to some. After all, God is a God of truth and He cannot lie. However, the Bible teaches that among the severest of God’s judgments is the giving people/societies over to their sins. For example, this is what is described in Romans 1. God reveals himself to people who then suppress the truth by their unrighteousness. The judgment, as described throughout the chapter, comes in three stages—each as a result of rejecting God and His ways: 1) the giving people over to their immorality; 2) the giving people over to their perversions; and 3) the giving people over to a debased mind, as they delight and applaud one another in their wickedness. Whether persons want to acknowledge it, America has gone through each of these stages. We live in a society in which evil is not only tolerated but embraced.

As for permitting a lying spirit, this too is an act of judgement, a punishment fitting the crime. Ironically, and tragically, God permits individuals who despise truth to receive lies, which is exactly what they want. We see an example of this in 1 Kings.

Ahab was one of the most evil of the kings of Israel. The reign of him and his wife, Jezebel, was one of bloodshed, occultism, and hatred of God’s people—especially His prophets, because they spoke against his wickedness. During a situation when he was seeking an alliance with Jehoshaphat, the king of Judah, to go to war with him against the Syrians. The false prophets were saying what Ahab wanted to hear, that he would have the victory. Jehoshaphat was not impressed, so he inquired if there was an actual prophet of the Lord they could hear from. Notice what Ahab says: “There is yet one man by whom we may inquire of the Lord, Micaiah the son of Imlah, but I hate him, for he never prophesies good concerning me, but evil” (1 Kings 22:8). Well, duh! Because you continuously did what was evil, Ahab! Anyway, here is what the Bible says regarding Ahab’s fate:

And the messenger who went to summon Micaiah said to him, “Behold, the words of the prophets with one accord are favorable to the king. Let your word be like the word of one of them, and speak favorably.” But Micaiah said, “As the Lord lives, what the Lord says to me, that I will speak.” And when he had come to the king, the king said to him, “Micaiah, shall we go to Ramoth-gilead to battle, or shall we refrain?” And he answered him, “Go up and triumph; the Lord will give it into the hand of the king.” But the king said to him, “How many times shall I make you swear that you speak to me nothing but the truth in the name of the Lord?” And he said, “I saw all Israel scattered on the mountains, as sheep that have no shepherd. And the Lord said, ‘These have no master; let each return to his home in peace.’” And the king of Israel said to Jehoshaphat, “Did I not tell you that he would not prophesy good concerning me, but evil?” And Micaiah said, “Therefore hear the word of the Lord: I saw the Lord sitting on his throne, and all the host of heaven standing beside him on his right hand and on his left; and the Lord said, ‘Who will entice Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramoth-gilead?’ And one said one thing, and another said another. Then a spirit came forward and stood before the Lord, saying, ‘I will entice him.’ And the Lord said to him, ‘By what means?’ And he said, ‘I will go out, and will be a lying spirit in the mouth of all his prophets.’ And he said, ‘You are to entice him, and you shall succeed; go out and do so.’ Now therefore behold, the Lord has put a lying spirit in the mouth of all these your prophets; the Lord has declared disaster for you.”

Then Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah came near and struck Micaiah on the cheek and said, “How did the Spirit of the Lord go from me to speak to you?” And Micaiah said, “Behold, you shall see on that day when you go into an inner chamber to hide yourself.” And the king of Israel said, “Seize Micaiah, and take him back to Amon the governor of the city and to Joash the king’s son, and say, ‘Thus says the king, “Put this fellow in prison and feed him meager rations of bread and water, until I come in peace.”’” And Micaiah said, “If you return in peace, the Lord has not spoken by me.” And he said, “Hear, all you peoples!” ~ 1 Kings 22:13-28

Even though Ahab witnessed the truth of prophets such as Elijah and Micaiah, he had such hatred for God and His messengers he would rather embrace lies than yield to truth, though it would have preserved his life. In no way did God lie or deceive Ahab. As Bible teacher, Warren Weirsbe notes, God actually revealed truth to Ahab concerning what would happen if he rejected Micaiah’s warnings. But so intense was Ahab’s hatred, he would rather die in a lie, which is exactly what happened.

America has forbidden God in its institutions, mocks Him in her entertainment, and applauds all that is contrary to His ways. Politicians who are known to be corrupt and habitual liars are applauded. Persons who try to speak any truth or reasonableness are resisted with vehemence. And ideologies, such as Marxism, are taking root, despite the fact they have never worked and have brought unimaginable cruelty and suffering to tens of millions of people, trampling both freedom and human dignity. 

Our society has become one that, indeed, calls evil good and good evil. Increasingly criminals are being defended while the law-abiding are penalized. And on it goes. “Truth” can be shaped into anything vile or perverse and be accepted, just as long as it jettisons facts, common sense, decency, and integrity.

Not only has God given America over to its immorality, perversions, and debased thinking, it also seems likely He has permitted a lying spirit to tell society what it wants to hear so that it will believe the lie. The danger America is in is incomprehensible. Her only hope is by turning to the Lord. But I’m afraid she is like Ahab, in that she would rather die in a lie, rather than yield to God and live. Oh, the tragedy of it all.

The Church’s Need to Press Into God

This is not intended to slam the church, but the time has come for Christians to stop “playing” church and start being the church. It’s time to jettison the numbers game and to start getting serious about authentic discipleship. It’s far past time for treating churches like businesses and trend-setters, and to start getting serious about Jesus Christ and His Great Commission—adhering to Jesus’ instructions instead of sinful men’s ingenuity.

For the past several decades the church has pressed more into the world, learning from its practices, ways, and examples to try to woo persons to Jesus, instead of pressing into God in prayer, proclaiming the true gospel, and trusting the work of the Holy Spirit to convict people of sin and drawing them to Christ in truth. However, what has happened instead is the church has become, by and large, impotent, ineffective, and irrelevant. In the meantime, the world is rapidly changing—and not for the better. Spiritual deception is running rampant, the world’s powerful elitists (including the Pope—who is not an ambassador of Christ) are pushing for a one world governance, which the Bible says will be demonically orchestrated and will give rise to the evil-to-the-core Antichrist. A secular, godless world is already being conditioned to embrace such a horrific leader to be its pseudo-savior.

Sadly, many preachers are more concerned with building megachurches, and many who profess to be Christians are more interested in feeling warm fuzzies, playing religious games, and slithering in and out of services without any commitment, rather than becoming genuine disciples and ambassadors of Christ, and being ready at any time for His return.

It’s high time for Christians to get serious about sin and repentance, and for so-called “backsliders” to stop feigning an empty faith and get right with God. We are entering a time when we can’t afford to play and mess around. Governments around the world are becoming increasingly corrupt, and it seems godless Marxism is is increasingly taking root. These, and the globalist elites do view Christianity with hostility. There is a strong storm brewing, and those who are not truly building their faith on the solid foundation of Christ and His teachings are in for a terribly rude awakening.

It’s timed or the church to press into the holy God, and to stop trying to appease the world. It’s time to return to proclaiming the true gospel and to warn of the wrath to come (1 Thes. 2:16). Indeed, we must speak the truth in love, but it’s high time to stop cuddling people in their sins. It’s true, they might choose to walk away forever from the grace offered them, but it’s their choice to make (Matt. 19:21-22). But this is better than cradling them in their sins and lying to them, giving them a false hope—which is exactly what it is when we try to say God accepts us and our sins or to simply deny something is sin that the Bible does call sin.

I wonder, when the storm comes, how many persons have genuine faith in Christ and His gospel that they’re not going to be swept away by the tides of deception and persecution? I’m both saddened and angered by how many are called pastors, but who are nothing but mongrels who have no business being behind the pulpit. They do not preach the whole counsel of God, they do not truly disciple and equip believers for kingdom living, but simply spin sermon lullabies, keeping persons lackadaisical. Many of them offer “gospels” which are not gospels at all, worthless teachings of temporal prosperity and a sense of belonging, but void of the true Spirit of Christ.

I’m not simply being unnecessarily critical. The Bible warns that in the last days deception and lawlessness will abound, and there will be a great apostasy (i.e., a falling away from the faith). Furthermore, we are warned: “But woe to you, O earth and sea, for the devil has come down to you in great wrath, because he knows that his time is short!” (Rev. 12:12). This dragon’s rage against the people of God is going to intensify, and he is going to give his authority to a man someday who is going to deceive many. This time might be closer than we think, if our world succumbs to a global governance. Eventually this is going to happen, but church, must it be now? Are we really to be like drunken or sleeping sentries who are oblivious to the forces of evil standing at the gates and ready for battle? Are the faithful to be left defenseless simply because so-called pastors are afraid of people leaving their churches because of truth or simply trying to make a name for themselves, rather than exalting them name of Jesus? Understand, every one of us will one day give account, and not everyone who says of Jesus, “Lord, Lord,” will enter the kingdom of heaven (Matt. 7:21-23).

The church can no longer afford to “do business as usual.” We must begin pressing into God. First, we need to confess and repent of our religious games, idolatry, and apathy. Second, we need to plead for God’s protection from the storm to come, which might be closer than we think. Third, we need to plead for  divine discernment in these times, for lies and deception are all around us and are growing increasingly worse. Our nation and world have entered a downward spiral of which there is no recovering from except for the mercy of God in response to the prayers of His people. But the question remains, will we cast off our obstinance and pride to press into God for healing and restoration?

The Necessity of Prayer

Do we believe in the absolute importance of prayer, and do we truly desire revival in the lives of Christians and for great awakening in the lives of unbelievers? No we don’t, for these will not come apart from fervent prayer. Yet, by and large, most churches no longer have regular prayer meetings. Many churches no longer have altar calls. And hardly will you hear the stressing of prayer or the need for revival from pulpits. There was a time when, in many Baptist, Methodist, and Pentecostal churches, altar calls were filled with persons crying out to God for lost family members and friends. But that is now a bygone era. Advertise that Chris Tomlin will be playing at a certain time of the week and you’d have people coming from miles around. Have a prayer meeting any time of the week and the average church would be lucky to have even a tenth of its members attend.

Do we believe in the vitality of prayer? No, we put more stock in formal theological education, good preaching, conferences, and good ol’ know-how, despite the fact Jesus tells us plainly, “Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing” (John 15:5). 

So important is prayer to the very One we call our Sovereign Savior and Lord, He says, “Is it not written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations’?” (Luke 19:46)

Greg Frizzell rightly notes, “If a restaurant is called a ‘House of Fish,’ that implies … that the prominent practice of that establishment is the cooking and eating of fish. When you call a place a ‘house of something,’ you certainly expect that ‘something’ to be the predominant practice of the establishment. In the exact same way, if the church is to be the ‘house of prayer,’ God expects prayer to be its predominant ongoing practice. When a church chooses to become a house of prayer, the practice of prayer literally saturates all it does.”

Are churches today known as “houses of prayer”? No, they’re called either houses of God or houses of worship. An average church service will have about 20 minutes of worship time, 30-45 minutes of preaching, and maybe five minutes of prayer. We like to think God is honored by all of this because we do it all in His name, but is He honored when we deliberately disregard what He has told us what He desires for the emphasis of His house to be? And is it any wonder why churches and denominations are in such poor shape? Understand, sound biblical teaching and genuine worship are, indeed, important as well. But it is through prayer and the moving of God which fuels these with power. A pastor is not a savior. If churches are not being the church, and a house of prayer filled with the Holy Spirit, a pastor will not be able to fix what’s broken, regardless how talented he might be. He might preach well, and organize well, but he is completely helpless in doing what only God can do in response to the prayers of His people. 

Furthermore, (and I believe this wholeheartedly) a church will only value and emphasize prayer as much as the leadership will. If leadership puts stock in various credentials, those are what the church will put stock in. If the leadership will not stress prayer, neither will the church. The emphases on prayer and its necessity must be a priority of those in leadership, for only then will the church begin to recognize its importance. Only as God’s people humbly and sincerely cry out to Him in faith, will we witness mighty moves of God. I’m not talking about ridiculous sensationalism, as one might see on TBN, but genuine moves of God when people are convicted of sin, the chains of vices and addictions are broken, and people becoming genuinely inflamed with passion for Christ. 

We are told in Matthew 9:36-38, “When [Jesus] saw the crowds, he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. Then he said to his disciples, ‘The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.’”

Why does Jesus command us to pray earnestly on this matter? If God is sovereign and has no need of us, then why must we pray? Yet, although God is sovereign, the Scriptures teach us that many things either happen or not—depending on whether God’s people pray. But let me ask, does Jesus contradict His own sovereignty? He certainly does not, yet He commands us to pray earnestly for laborers in God’s harvest. And by laborers, does he simply mean those who are formally trained in a theological institution? This is highly doubtful, since in Acts 4, we are told of two of Jesus’s disciples who stood before the Jewish Council, “Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were uneducated, common men, they were astonished. And they recognized that they had been with Jesus” (v. 13). Then later, when a controversy arose between the Jewish and Greek believers, the apostles commanded, “Brothers, pick out from among you seven men of good repute, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we will appoint to this duty. But we will devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word.” Notice the lack of worldly credentials in both accounts. Instead, the emphases are company with Jesus, good reputation, fullness of the Spirit and of wisdom, and prayer. 

Now, consider what some of the great saints have said about prayer:

Oswald Chambers observes, “Prayer seems like such a small thing to do—next to nothing at all in fact. But that’s not what Jesus said. To Him, prayer is everything…. We tend to use prayer as a last resort, but Jesus wants it to be our first line of defense. We pray when there’s nothing else we can do, but Jesus wants us to pray before we do anything at all…. He wants us to talk to Him, not aboutHim. He wants us to talk to Him about unbelievers before we talk to unbelievers about Him. Prayer is not just an exercise routine God has us on; it’s our business, our only business. Prayer is our holy occupation. Plain and simple.”

John Calvin rocognizes our desperate need for prayer, as he notes, “we are plagued with such poverty and destitution that even the best of us must sigh and groan continually, and call on the Lord with all humility.”

Charles Spurgeon, the prince of preachers, declared, “I would rather teach one man to pray than ten men to preach.”

Thomas Watson, the great Puritan, notes, “The angel fetched Peter out of prison, but it was prayer that fetched the angel.” Watson also notes, “That prayer is most likely to pierce heaven which first pierces one’s own heart.”  

The Puritan, William Gurnall, says of the importance of corporate prayer, “There is a wonderful prevalency in the joint prayers of [God’s] people. When Peter was in prison, the church met and prayed him out of his enemies’ hands. A prince will grant a petition subscribed by the hands of the whole city, which, may be, he would not at the request of a private subject, and yet love him well too. There is an especial promise to public prayer: “Where two or three are gathered together in My name, there am I in the midst of them.” 

Jonathan Edwards says, “Prayer is as natural an expression of faith as breathing is to life.” He also notes, “When God is about to do a mighty new thing He always sets His people praying.”

And lastly, Henry Blackaby observes, “Studying revivals throughout history will reveal that they are not identical. Revivals in Wales, New England, Kentucky, Korea, India, Ruanda, and South Africa had characteristics unique to the people and the social environment in which they occurred. However, in every revival the consistent common denominator is fervent, faithful, persistent, righteous prayer.”

So, I ask again, do we believe in the utmost vitality of prayer? Is it not strange that in churches one is more prone to hear quotes on Calvin’s teachings on God’s sovereignty, Billy Graham’s thoughts on evangelism, or even some hogwash from persons of questionable theology and character, rather than on the very words of the incarnate Son of God when He stresses the importance of prayer? And why are many of us negligent in prayer? Does it not boil down to a mixture of pride (thinking we can accomplish great things—which is very contrary to the Scriptures, as well as to reformed theology), lack of fervor for Christ and His glory, laziness, unbelief, and really, straight-up apathy for the lost? Men, we give so many lousy excuses for our lack of praying, but these five reasons are truly why we do not give more attention to prayer. Yet, if one reads some of the Puritan prayers in books like, The Valley of Vision or Piercing Heaven, he will read passionate prayers exemplifying genuine humility and the awareness of personal sinfulness, a burning passion for the glory of Christ and the furtherance of His kingdom, confidence in the mercies, providence, and wisdom of God, and pleadings for God to pour out His mercies on others as He has done so to them.

Charles Spurgeon, who was a staunch Calvinist, understood the dual, non-contradictory truths of God’s sovereignty and man’s responsibility better than any preacher I know of. In one of his sermons on these very things, in the first part of his message he stresses the biblical teaching of God’s sovereignty in salvation. Later, he argues against the hyper-Calvinists of his day, saying, “When God sent the prophets to Israel and stretched forth His hands, what was it for? What did He wish them to come to Him for? Why, to be saved. 

            ‘No,’ says one, ‘it was for temporal mercies.’ Not so, my friend; the verse before is concerning spiritual mercies, and so is this one, for they refer to the same thing. Now, was God sincere in His offer? God forgive the man that dares to say He was not.”

It is true, God is sovereign over our salvation. Not a single one of us, comes to God apart from Him making the first move toward us. Yet, let not our lofty views of Calvinism blind our minds and hearts to the equal truth of God’s love and desire for the lost to come to know Him and so be saved. Just as definite God will one day thoroughly judge the wicked in His wrath, so just as definite are His tender mercies for them, as He told the angry prophet, Jonah, concerning the ruthless, idolatrous Ninevites, “Should I not pity Nineveh, that great city, in which there are 120,000 persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and also much cattle?” Just as surely as God’s sovereignty over our salvation are His words spoken through Ezekiel, “As I live, declares the Lord God, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but that the wicked turn from his way and live” (33:11). Just as certain as the apostle who stressed in Romans that God “has mercy on whomever he wills, and he hardens whomever he wills” (9:18), is also the same apostle who emphasized to his protégé, “First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all” (1 Tim. 2:1-6).

But how will people come to this saving knowledge of Christ? Simply by God’s sovereignty? We are not granted any more authority than the liberal to pick and choose what Scriptures we like or prefer. As Spurgeon notes, ‘The system of truth is not one straight line but two. No man will ever get a right view of the gospel until he knows how to look at the two lines at once.” What he is talking about is the truth of God’s sovereignty as being one line, and God’s sincere invitation to all people to repent. But how will men come to saving faith in Christ? Simply by solid biblical preaching? Someone might say, “Yes, for so Paul says in Romans 10.” But does one think, really, that the power comes from a preacher apart from prayer?

But what does Jesus say? He tells us to pray. He tells us to pray that God will send laborers into His harvest. He tells us to ask, seek, and knock. And what does Paul say? Does he say to simply preach and let the chips fall wherever they are sovereignly destined? No, he tells us to pray.

How can the fire of revival sweep through our churches or a great awakening resound throughout the nations? Indeed, these must come by God’s sovereign power, there’s no doubt about that. But does not God invite us to ask and plead for these? James tells us we have not because we ask not. Is it not true that we do not earnestly pray for these? When was the last time you pleaded for revival in private prayer? Or when has the church gathered to plead for revival? Churches will only do so when they truly recognize they need revival. How many of us genuinely believe we ourselves need to be revived? Those of us who are fathers, do we just give everything to our children, or do we not often give things only when they sincerely ask?

Did the Holy Spirit fall on His disciples during Pentecost sovereignly, while they were sleeping, or when they were together in the upper room praying, utterly dependent on God’s direction and moving? Was Peter released from prison simply by the sovereign hand of God or was it in connection with a gathering of believers pleading fervently on his behalf? When Moses was on top of a hill with Aaron and Hur, watching Joshua and his army fighting the Amalekites, did God simply help Joshua prevail or was it only as Moses raised His hands to God? Prayer was vital in each of these events.

We often view Paul as some spiritual powerhouse, but when we read his letters, we see he was a man devoted to prayer, as well as dependent on the fervent prayers of God’s people. In the thirteen letters of Paul, he mentions prayer in some form nearly fifty times. To the Ephesians, he asks that they pray for him, “that words may be given to me in opening my mouth boldly to proclaim the mystery of the gospel” (6:19). To the Colossian believers, he writes, “Pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ” (4:3). He says in his letter to Philemon, “I pray that the sharing of your faith may become effective” (1:6).

And as I was preparing for this study, I was reminded of a dear brother’s message recently, from the prophet Ezekiel, when God said, “And I sought for a man among them who should build up the wall and stand in the breach before me for the land, that I should not destroy it, but I found none” (22:30). As this brother pointed out, is God not looking for men to stand in the breach today, when our country and world are standing on the brink of destruction? Are we to be content with God’s judgment on the wicked? Such an attitude reveals the wickedness of our own hearts and is no reflection of the tender heart of God. God wants us to pray.

As Southern Baptists, we might pride ourselves for our dedication to the Great Commission, but what are we that we can accomplish anything? Can we truly fulfill it by our own strength and ingenuity? The common underlying attitude is that we can. No, of course we don’t say this outrightly, but our lack of prayer declares this as much. But how’s this going for us so far? The Great Commission was never intended to be fulfilled apart from true commitment to Christ’s teachings, an absolute dependence on Him through prayer, and the filling of His Holy Spirit.

Men, should we not feel ashamed when the ladies of many of our churches have taken it upon themselves to make time to get together for times of prayer, when God has called us to be the spiritual leaders? This is not a criticism of the women, but of us, for it is we who should have taken the lead.

Leaders, whether you are pastors, deacons, or on committees, don’t expect great things for our churches if prayer is not of utmost priority. Jesus states plainly that apart from Him, we can do nothing. This fact remains true whether we accept it or not. 

If we genuinely desire to see revival take place in our churches, and to see people experience true life in Christ as they are delivered from the bondage of sin and the devil, then we must become a people and houses of prayer. Otherwise we will simply remain a people who do churchystuff. If we truly desire revival, then we must actively plead for it. We might blame the lack of revival or awakening on men’s wickedness or God’s just sovereignty, but we are just as much to blame when we are unwilling to acknowledge our own sins and stand in the gap on behalf of the people.

I think I have made it clear that we do not truly see prayer as being absolutely vital, despite what we might say with our mouths. However, what are we going to do with the charge presented here? Like the church in Ephesus, we might have impeccably sound theology, but this does not guarantee fervency of spirit and passionate love for Christ. May churches truly become a houses of prayer to the nations and devoted to our first love. To not do so means to both remain powerless and to dwell in sin because of choosing to not become a house of prayer. Brethren, we must repent. Let us not think that God shares in our apathy for a lost and dying world around us, nor think that somehow our concern and burden for them is greater than His. Our hills of love in which He creates within us will never compare to the mountains of love which are an eternal part of Him.

In closing, may we truly begin to understand the necessity of prayer. Jesus says this place is to be a house of prayer. And as Chambers says, prayer is to be our holy occupation. 

Let us pray.

When Night Is at Its Darkest

On one of my trips to Uganda, our mission team stayed at a place where the electricity was rationed. There were days and nights we did not have electricity. At night, because there was no streetlights or lamps, it was unbelievably—even unnervingly—dark. I was glad someone in the village was able to give me a couple of candles. They were small, but they were comforting enough to help me fall asleep. I woke up to be greeted by sunlight. The sun had not abandoned Earth.

There are times the “dark nights of the soul” can be extremely—despairingly—dark. There are nights of depression when the blackness can seem to swallow up the light, and like water fills every corner and gap. A person can feel as though he is literally drowning in his loneliness and despair.

In life, when night is at its darkest, when loneliness is at its most painful, when sadness is at its deepest, when despondency comes rushing in waves like a devastating tsunami, then one can find himself in an extremely vulnerable position.

That ancient serpent, the devil, comes with malicious deceit, whispering lies into the mind that seem to have impeccable logic. “If God is faithful, where is He? Nobody loves or wants you, why else is your mailbox void of letters and invitations? Why else does your phone remain silent? Those around you are successful, but what have you done? You haven’t accomplished anything! You’re just a blemish, a failure! If you were dead, your family would be better off and the world wouldn’t be at any loss. There are some razor blades in the garage or some pill bottles in the medicine cabinet.” The darkness  becomes seemingly unbearable.

Many have not experienced such a dark night of the soul or suffered such mental, emotional, and spiritual anguish. Give glory to God! But many know full well what I am talking about. Sadly, many get to the point where they can no longer endure the inner torment.

The promises of God can be like little candles in such darkness, but they can give a soft glow bringing some comfort to allow you to get some rest before the coming dawn—the dawn will come. The darkness will not extinguish the light:

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. ~ John 1:5

For he has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” ~ Hebrews 13:5

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus…. And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies. For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees?… What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will he not also with him graciously give us all things? Who shall bring any charge against God’s elect? It is God who justifies. Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died—more than that, who was raised—who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, “For your sake we are being killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.” No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. ~ Romans 8:1, 23-24, 31-39

but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ~ Romans 5:8

The lies of the evil one come like the fury of a hurricane, trying to blow out the flames of God’s promises, but one needs not fear, though hopeless he might feel. In the midst of the raging waters and violent winds, we are told:

It is impossible for God to lie, we who have fled for refuge might have strong encouragement to hold fast to the hope set before us. We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner place behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest forever after the order of Melchizedek. ~ Hebrews 6:18-20

When night is at its darkest, keep close to you the light of God’s promises. Although you might feel despondent, God is faithful. Look to Christ, pray to Christ, cry out to Christ, cling to Christ, and trust in Christ. He will bring you safely to the coming dawn.

12 Deceptions Christians Are Succumbing To

Each of us is deceivable and have fallen for lies of one kind or other, whether we were conned out of money, wooed and trusted sweet nothings, suckered by political rhetoric, etc. The trail of deception is littered with broken hearts, shattered dreams, oppression, vice, and emptied wallets and bank accounts. Deception is never innocent, and it always leaves behind tears, pain, and sometimes even death.

The Bible repeatedly warns persons against various deceptions. The proud and arrogant declare God simply wants to withhold freedom from us (God could easily bind us and cast us into hell if He wanted to, we are no threat to Him whatsoever), but God gives us boundaries and warnings for our protection. To dismiss these can result in dire consequences. Much like the accounts we hear of occasionally about those ignoring the posted signs at the Grand Canyon or on beaches. 

God has posted numerous signs warning us of danger. Sadly, many who profess to be Christians dismiss these signs, thinking their wisdom and goodness is somehow superior to God’s. My friend, this is an impossibly on both accounts. But let each of us be warned, to dismiss these can have severe ramifications. 

  1. Claiming to have no sin. One can become very susceptible to this deception when either he thinks a sin he is committing is not sin or if he thinks he is so spiritual that he thinks he is so severed with his sinful nature he is now above being tempted with sin. Note, the sinful nature (Gk. sarx) is not redeemed and it will neverstop loving and craving sin. “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” (1 John 1:8). We must also beware of this deception when dealing with the sins of others. As one points out the specks in another’s eye, the log in one’s own eye must not be ignored (Matt. 7:1-5). The goal of confrontation is always to be for repentance and reconciliation, not for shaming and condemning.
  2. Being hearers of the Word but not doers. This is the grave danger of nominal Christians especially. We are told, “But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves” (James 1:22). God is not simply interested in church attendance, religious activities, or “good deeds.” He desires obedience from a pure heart. God spoke through Samuel to King Saul, “Has the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord?Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to listen than the fat of rams. For rebellion is as the sin of divination, and presumption is as iniquity and idolatry” (1 Sam. 15:22-23). Think of it this way, a boss or a parent is not pleased when an employee or child simply hears instructions, but when the instructions are carried out and fulfilled.
  3. Empty words. Today, as in the days of the apostles, false teachers infiltrated churches promoting such things as vulgarity, immorality, and covetousness (greed). These dismiss the warnings of judgment and hell as they continue to speak empty words of flattery and desensitization. Paul writes, “For you may be sure of this, that everyone who is sexually immoral or impure, or who is covetous (that is, an idolater), has no inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and God. Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of these things the wrath of God comes upon the sons of disobedience…. Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them. For it is shameful even to speak of the things that they do in secret. But when anything is exposed by the light, it becomes visible” (Eph. 5:5-6, 11-13).
  4. Thinking the unrighteous will inherit the kingdom of God. This deception runs rampant solely because of teachings of cheap grace apart from the necessity of repentance, and sin being minimized, trivialized, or denied. Nevertheless, Paul sternly warns, “Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God” (1 Cor. 6:9-10). Certainly such sins can be forgiven of, and persons might still feel stirrings of temptation. However, to indulge in such practices as though God is indifferent, or even condoning, is a great deception, indeed. Such persons will not inherit the kingdom of God, nor are they citizens thereof.
  5. Thinking bad company doesn’t corrupt good morals. One of the unpleasant principles in this fallen world is that it is easier to pollute than to purify, to defile than to sanctify. It is unwise to think one can continuously keep company with persons who are immoral, vulgar, and the like and not be affected. We are warned, “Do not be deceived: ‘Bad company ruins good morals’” (1 Cor. 15:33). This doesn’t mean we are to cut ties with everyone who doesn’t believe, but it does mean we need to beware of our own vulnerabilities. If one desires to grow in Christ, wisdom, and purity, he must keep company with Christ, His Word, and His people. 
  6. Having one’s thoughts led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ. The church today is just as susceptible to the cunning of deceitful liars promoting false Christs and false gospels. Paul writes, “But I am afraid that as the serpent deceived Eve by his cunning, your thoughts will be led astray from a sincere and pure devotion to Christ. For if someone comes and proclaims another Jesus than the one we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit from the one you received, or if you accept a different gospel from the one you accepted, you put up with it readily enough” (2 Cor. 11:3-4). Many today are being led astray from a pure and sincere devotion to Christ for “health and wealth,” warm fuzzies, a false gospel demanding no cost or repentance.
  7. Thinking one is something when he is nothing. In context, this is more than just mere pride, but the thinking one is above showing gentleness and understanding towards one who has fallen in a transgression, thinking himself to be above succumbing to such temptation. “Brothers, if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness. Keep watch on yourself, lest you too be tempted. Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ. For if anyone thinks he is something, when he is nothing, he deceives himself. But let each one test his own work, and then his reason to boast will be in himself alone and not in his neighbor. For each will have to bear his own load” (Gal. 6:1-5). Each of us is in desperate need of grace, and none of us is above temptation or giving into it. One deceives himself to think he is somehow superior to  another who has fallen, be it another believer or otherwise. Each of us has fallen short of the glory of God (Rom. 3:23). Even among the righteous, there’s not one who never sins (Ecc. 7:20).
  8. Philosophy and empty deceit. A godless world and its philosophies/ideologies will always conflict and seek to undermine the teachings of the Scriptures. We can see this clearly in Darwinism, Marxism, Planned Parenthood, etc. Paul warns, “See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits of the world, and not according to Christ” (Col. 2:8). The world and the kingdom of God—and the teachings of both—are like oil and water. Many attempt to make these compatible (but they are not) and wind up having their faith shipwrecked in the end. We must guard our hearts from any and all teachings which would draw us away from the truth of Christ and the Scriptures.
  9. Thinking sin doesn’t have repercussions. Moses warned the people of his day, and this warning echoes through the corridor of time to us, “Be sure your sin will find you out” (Num. 32:23). This warning is not empty. All sin has consequences and is injurious. One might feel its negative effects immediately or years later, but let us be sure that our sins will eventually find us out. In the New Testament, we are further warned, “Do not be deceived: God is not mocked, for whatever one sows, that will he also reap. For the one who sows to his own flesh will from the flesh reap corruption, but the one who sows to the Spirit will from the Spirit reap eternal life. And let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up” (Gal. 6:7-9). If one sows to his flesh (i.e., for his own selfish pleasures), he will eventually reap a harvest of corruption and death. It is the one who sows to the Spirit who reaps eternal life. God is not mocked, persons will reap what they sow. The seeds of sin being forth poisonous fruit, regardless how sweet and pleasant the taste might be, and poison is always harmful, if not fatal.
  10. Doubting God’s good character and motives. There are many mysteries which escape our understanding. For example, why were we born in our particular time, place, and circumstances? Some are born surrounded with love and security, while others are born in the midst of turmoil and hostility. Still, in a fallen world not everything is as it seems. Affluence often hinders persons from true blessings. Pain and heartache can develop character and compassion. Regardless, each of us grow in different circumstances in which we must make choices. Yet we are told, “And he made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined allotted periods and the boundaries of their dwelling place, that they should seek God, and perhaps feel their way toward him and find him. Yet he is actually not far from each one of us” (Acts 17:27-28). Still, our environments present various temptations and vices. One can travel a dark, dangerous path if he begins blaming God for his temptations and failures, for this brings into question God’s benevolence. But we are told, “Let no one say when he is tempted, ‘I am being tempted by God,’ for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire. Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death. Do not be deceived, my beloved brothers. Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow due to change” (James 1:13-17). When one begins to question God’s goodness, such a person falls for the same lie that led to the Fall.
  11. Thinking one is religious but not bridling his tongue. Here, “religious” is used in a positive sense, such as devoted, pious, and faithful. James says a lot about the misuse of one’s tongue, and declares that it is a world of evil. With the tongue persons boast, blame God, speak falsehood, and curse people who are made in God’s image. He writes, “If anyone thinks he is religious and does not bridle his tongue but deceives his heart, this person’s religion is worthless. Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world” (James 1:26-27). The great boasts of the tongue, even in the things of faith, are quite deceitful if one’s heart and life are contrary to God’s character and Word.
  12. Thinking one can practice unrighteousness and be of God. One of the grave deceptions of our day is the teaching that, because Jesus died for our sins and we are saved by grace, we can therefore live however we want, believe how we want. But the apostle John writes explicitly, “You know that he appeared in order to take away sins, and in him there is no sin. No one who abides in him keeps on sinning; no one who keeps on sinning has either seen him or known him. Little children, let no one deceive you. Whoever practices righteousness is righteous, as he is righteous. Whoever makes a practice of sinning is of the devil, for the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:5-8). Many who profess to be Christ’s are carrying on the works of the devil, practicing unrighteousness all in the name of Christ. The darkness of this deception is deep, indeed. “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!” (Isa. 5:20). The apostle Peter says this of those who genuinely belong to Christ, “But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. Once you were not a people, but now you are God’s people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy” (1 Pet. 2:9-10).

Many will dismiss the warnings and continue on in deception, but the further one goes the more entangled he becomes. God gives us warnings for our good but will not force our hand. The signs warn of danger, and those who disregard them do so to their own—and other’s—harm. If you realize you’ve passed a warning sign, stop and turn around (repent). Let the Lord guide you back onto safe paths.

Is Something Being Evil Dependent on Who’s Doing It?

For the past several years there has been a deep, growing agitation in my spirit, and it has to do with when professing Christians cry out against wickedness and when they don’t. The intensity and volume of the evil doesn’t seem to be the issue, but whom is committing it. Mind you, all wickedness should be detested and called out, whether in the world or in the church. However, what has become problematic is not that wickedness is called out against certain individuals, but that greater acts of evil are often casually dismissed. 

Before I continue (because I’m about to talk about President Trump), I’ve never been offended by people not liking him. What does upset me is the complete hatred and hostility some reserve only for him. I know of an individual who was very vocal in declaring Trump as evil, even going so far as to say he’s the Antichrist. Yet, this same person boasted Obama as “the greatest president ever,” despite the fact that he promoted and applauded nearly everything that goes against the Scriptures. I know of another who also was very condemning of Trump, calling him a liar, immoral, and evil. Yet, Obama, the Clinton’s, Elizabeth Warren, and the like have whole careers build upon lies, and the immorality of the Clinton’s is no secret, but he would only justify them. “But Bill repented,” he said. Really? There was nothing going on when he and Hillary visited a pedophile’s island? Give me a break. 

Mind you, I’m not condoning any of Trump’s faults, Lord knows he has some. Yes, he’s arrogant, but so is Obama (he just masks it better with his charisma). Yes, he’s lied, but he’s also kept many of his promises. Evil? Hmm, as opposed to whom?

Beth Moore, and others, claiming to take a “moral stand” outspokenly condemned Trump for certain sexual allegations (if true, he has a right to be criticized). Yet, in their supposed “moral high ground,” they supported Hillary during her campaign. The hypocrisy of this just baffles me. Hillary, no doubt, is a wicked Jezebel of our day, whose platform was nothing less than a celebration of death, as a crowd of thousands cheered and applauded the mutilation of the unborn. Trump, on the other hand, was a staunch supporter of protecting the lives of the helpless innocent. Hillary and Bill were good friends with Epstein, visiting his island numerous times. Apparently, Beth has no issue with this. Trump took a stand against human trafficking, but no one seems to care about this. Why? Is human trafficking evil? Or only if Trump had supported it?

I know a lady who was very vocal against Trump, thinking he should have been impeached. Strangely, I’ve never heard her criticize Obama or the mess that’s going on in the current administration. When Trump was president, boy, was she ever vocal about the border crisis and such. But she’s mysteriously quiet now, even though the situation is worse, and kids are being trafficked and raped. She mentions how awful the situation in Afghanistan is now, but no mentioning how Biden simply forsook the people there, leaving women to be raped, men to be killed, and Christians to be slaughtered. So desperate is the situation is many were willing to try to hang on to a plane as it took off, only to fall to their deaths.

None of this is to minimize any wickedness Trump is guilty of. However, it is intended to criticize the hypocrisy of many who so magnified every wickedness of one, while dismissing the brazen evil of others. Is evil simply dependent on who’s committing it, or is something evil inherently, simply because it is evil? Are the lines really so blurry no one can tell the difference?