Be Careful Little Eyes and Ears

Perhaps you’re familiar with the children’s rhyme, “O be careful little eyes what you see.” The second verse says, “O be careful little ears what you hear.” We might consider these nice words for a children’s song, but these are profound wisdom for adults. As Christians, we live in a culture immersed in godlessness. Music, movies, and literature glorify immorality, vice, violence, and sacrilege. Politicians use lying and deception for their advantages in power and wealth, and because of smoke and mirrors—and some blackmail—many get away with all sorts of crimes and sordid behaviors behind the scenes. Educational institutions vigorously promote secular humanism, where everything is permissible and/or rationalized—except for Jesus Christ and the truth.

For the person who truly desires to draw near to God and grow in his relationship to Christ, “be careful little eyes [and ears]” takes on deeper significance. What we choose to allow our eyes to see, ears to hear, and minds to entertain will affect our hearts and behaviors in one way or another. The Scriptures have much to say about these.

Jesus knows how visual men are and how prone we are to entertain lustful glances and thoughts. So serious is this matter, He says, “But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery with her in his heart. If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body be thrown into hell” (Matt. 5:28-29). Although He speaks hyperbolically, He is stressing to men, “Be careful little eyes what you see. Do what you must to protect yourself from what enters.”

The apostle Paul says we are to “take every thought captive to obey Christ” (2 Cor. 10:5). This responsibility is made more difficult if one takes into his eyes, ears, and mind those things which are sinful and anti-Christ in nature. 

Elsewhere Paul writes, “Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things” (Phil. 4:8). In another letter he warns, “See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy [i.e., ideologies and shifting human reasoning] and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits [or principles]of the world, and not according to Christ” (Col. 2:8).

Consider what you are allowing your  little eyes to see and little ears to hear. What affect are they having on your thoughts, and what’s funneling down to your heart? Are the things you’re allowing your eyes to see and ears to hear drawing you closer to Christ or pulling you away? Are you allowing pictures and videos to arouse insatiable desires within you? What about the music you listen to? Is it feeding sensual desires or emotions of anger or despair? What about the teachings you’re listening to and the literature you’re reading. Are they amplifying the Spirit’s promptings or muffling His convictions? 

“O be careful little eyes what you see.” Are these just words for children? No, but these are words inviting us to partake of the wellsprings of life. But do we have the ears to hear and the eyes to see?

7 Hindrances to Prayer

Sound theology teaches us that God is both personal and the Sovereign over the world He created. This being the case, it should come as no surprise that prayer is personal and comes with certain stipulations (as do all relationships). Furthermore, because God is the Sovereign One, He is to be approached as such. This being said, there are several hindrances to prayer to keep in mind.

  1. Sin. God is a God of holiness, purity, truth, love, and justice. Sin betrays these. Unconfessed  sin will hinder one’s prayers. “But your iniquities have made a separation between you and your God, and your sins have hidden his face from you so that he does not hear” (Isa. 59:2).
  2. Unbelief. One of the greatest hindrances to prayer is unbelief. Unbelief is an affront to God’s existence, character, or capabilities. We’re told that Jesus “did not do many mighty works there, because of their unbelief” (Matt. 13:58). And James writes, “But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea that is driven and tossed by the wind. For that person must not suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways” (1:6-8).
  3. Selfish motives. Prayer is to be more about God’s kingdom and human intercession than self promotion and advancement. James addresses this hindrance explicitly: “You do not have, because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive, because you ask wrongly, to spend it on your passions” (4:2-3)
  4. Outside God’s will. Sometimes one’s requests are outside of God’s will and plan. For example, Paul prayed three times for God to heal him of his “thorn in the flesh,” yet God denied his request each time, saying, “My grace is sufficient for you” (2 Cor. 12:9). God was using this “thorn” to humble and further develop the apostle.
  5. Self-righteousness. Pride has always plagued the human heart, creating the desire to one-up and trample upon others. God abhors such self-adulation and condescension of others—especially wrapped in religiosity. Jesus tells a parable about a self-righteous religious leader and a tax collector praying. The former was thankful he was not like sinners such as the tax collector. The tax collector, however, wouldn’t look up, but beat his chest, asking God to forgive him, a sinner. Jesus explains it is the tax collector who left the temple justified (Luke 18:9-14).
  6. Dishonoring your spouse. This is specifically directed to husbands. The apostle Peter writes, “Likewise, husbands, live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel, since they are heirs with you of the grace of life, so that your prayers may not be hindered” (1 Pet. 3:7). Men, being disrespectful of your wives and treating them in an un-Christlike will hinder prayers.
  7. Spiritual Warfare. Some hindrances to prayer are spiritual in nature, opposition from the evil one. We get a sneak peak of such a situation in the life of the prophet Daniel (chap. 10). He was a very godly man who had taken time to pray and fast. We learn their was opposition in the spiritual realm.

Persons can pray but this doesn’t mean anything is happening, much like a person shadow boxing. He is beating the air but nothing more. Some have given up praying, saying, “It doesn’t work.” However, prayer is powerful if one follows the instructions and purposes as laid out in the Manual—the Bible. May we approach the living God appropriately and on His terms, and may we remember the true and deeper purposes for prayer. We just might see more incredible moves of God if we do.