8 Truths About the Fear of the Lord

Rarely does one hear about the fear of the Lord nowadays. Even in most churches one will not hear of it much, let alone hear it taught about. Many view “fear” simply in a negative context; however, the fear of the Lord is actually a positive thing, if understood properly. I hope this article may shed some light on this neglected teaching, and that you will come to appreciate the fear of the Lord in a deeper way.

  1. It is more than mere reverence. It is a shame so many preachers and Bible commentators explain the fear of the Lord as simply as reverence for God. This might soften the word fear, but does it truly do the meaning of the phrase, as a whole, justice? If the fear of the Lord simply means reverence, then why wouldn’t the biblical writers plainly state, the reverence of the Lord? Jesus doesn’t mince words when He tells His disciples to not fear men but to fear God. “And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell” (Matt. 10:28). God is not one to simply tip one’s hat to and call it good.  The writer of Hebrews warns, It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God” (10:31). This dreadfulness is a reality, and the writers of Scripture don’t pussyfoot around it the way we do today. Certainly, reverence does play a part in the fear of the Lord, but so does, well, a healthy fear of a good, righteous, and sovereign King who will one day punish evil. 
  2. It is the beginning of knowledge and wisdom. Our world has many intelligent people, but the truly wiseare hard to find. There are scientists who are smart enough to design weapons of mass destruction, but not wise enough to create peace. There are crafty politicians who know how to sway and manipulate, but they are not wise in how to bring about authentic hope. And we have educators holding doctorate degrees and writing papers with all kinds of big words, but they’re void of the wisdom as to how to promote genuine love and equity. Wisdom has a starting place and a specific foundation: the fear of the Lord. Mockers will mock, scoffers will scoff, and fools will hate correction, so folly will continue to be the norm. But it doesn’t have to be this way. “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and instruction” (Pro. 1:7). “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight” (Pro. 9:10).
  3. It is to depart from evil. This is one of the major aspects of the fear of the Lord—to depart from evil and to draw near to God. It is to depart from deception, violence, and all the dangers which would pull persons away from the safety of God’s presence. People could be spared of a lot of heartache and regret if they understood this. “By steadfast love and faithfulness iniquity is atoned for, and by the fear of the Lord one turns away from evil” (Pro. 16:6).
  4. It gives confidence. There are so many who lack confidence in who they are and of the future. In the fear of the Lord persons can begin to understand who they are—and Whose they are—and the security of the sovereignty of God, the Maker of the heavens and the earth. “In the fear of the Lord one has strong confidence, and his children will have a refuge” (Pro. 14:26).
  5. It is a fountain of life. Our world is filled with poisoned waters, seemingly satisfying to the taste but destructive to the spirit. Immorality, unjust gain, debauchery, and the like are sweet to the taste, but sucks the life of those who partake of them. “The fear of the Lord is a fountain of life, that one may turn away from the snares of death” (Pro. 14:27).
  6. It is better than great treasure. Ours is a world that has an unhealthy love for money, wealth, and treasures. People steal, kill, and destroy for these, not understanding that eventually this very love for money is a cord that will one day strangle them. Jesus warns, what profit is it to gain the world while forfeiting one’s soul in the process (see Matt. 16:26). The value of the fear of the Lord far surpasses that of all the treasures of the world. “Better is a little with the fear of the Lord than great treasure and trouble with it” (Pro. 15:16).
  7. It comes with reward. The fear of the Lord is not simply a duty, of which you comply or else. To the ungodly, it seems as such; however, God promises reward for those who will walk in it. “The reward for humility and fear of the Lord is riches and honor and life. Thorns and snares are in the way of the crooked; whoever guards his soul will keep far from them” (Pro. 22:4-5). The satisfaction of wealth and fame is an illusion. The fear of the Lord, although not easy, will prove to be satisfying to those who accept it.
  8. It is to gain the knowledge of the Holy. The greatest reward of the fear of the Lord is the knowledge of God. Not simply head knowledge, but true experiential knowledge of Him. The fear of the Lord begins to open the spiritual eyes of persons to begin seeing His activities in the world and an understanding of His ways. God ceases to be questioned as a religious abstract, but understood as a concrete reality of those who are redeemed. The Bible ceases to be an archaic book of words, but is understood to be alive and life-transforming, because of the God who breathed them out (see Heb. 4:12; 2 Tim. 3:16). Ultimately, in God, through Christ, one finds true life. “Then you will understand the fear of the Lord and find the knowledge of God” (Pro. 2:5).

For the one who is willing to receive it, the fear of the Lord is truly a wonderful blessing intended to richly bless those who will accept it and walk in it. Indeed, it does have the aspect of showing reverence to the Lord, but it is far more than this. Hopefully the Scripture passages on the subject has helped you understand the fear of the Lord better, and that you can see it in its positive light.

What Is the Gospel?

What is the Gospel? Not simply in definition, but in practically? Put in another way, what does it mean to say, “I’m a Christian?” So much that is called “Christian” is not Christian at all. 

Going to church does not make one a Christian any more than stepping into a garage makes one a car. Neither does simply saying a prayer and holding to a confession of faith. Rather, is one born again by the Spirit of God? Is he yielding his life to the Holy Spirit, and is he becoming more like Jesus? Is one’s character being developed in holiness, love, and purity?

The significance of the Gospel is only recognized by those who realize they are deeply and grossly affected by sin. Yes, Jesus died for our sins, but by His resurrected life He seeks to change us.

My friend, how well do you understand the Gospel?

*For a deeper discussion on the matter, please visit my podcast, The PROCLAMATION!, episode: “What Is the Gospel.

https://anchor.fm/geno-pyse/episodes/What-Is-the-Gospel-e13an5i?fbclid=IwAR0_xClhVTR4P9GfzucuxU2q7qabTFJqxezkRyt9BKbHpIeVp8tz0WsgiN4

At This Point, Do You Walk Away?

In the sixth chapter of the Gospel of John, Jesus miraculously provided food for over five thousand people. Wow! So far, so good. At this point, Jesus is cool and life is good. It’s sort of like today, is it not? Jesus is cool and all is good if He is dishing out blessings, grace, encouragement, and forgiveness.

When Jesus and His disciples departed from the area and crossed the sea, we are told that the next morning many of the people also crossed the sea and sought after Jesus. Again, so far, so good. They are seeking after Christ. Like today, it is good when people are seeking after Him. 

When they found Him, Jesus confronts them with their motives. They were not seeking after Him, but for His blessings. They did not desire Him; rather, they simply wanted their needs met (see vs. 25-27). This is still like today. Many people do not truly desire Jesus, but the luxurious life televangelists promise, or peace of mind of going to heaven, or a healing, or warm fuzzies during a church service.

Beginning in verse 35, Jesus states that He is the bread of life, and He will provide life to those who come to Him. Furthermore, those who believe in Him He will resurrect in the last day. Here, the people began to grumble. Driving home the point of dependence on Him, Jesus says, “Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you” (vs. 53). Ah, this demand and this exclusivity is too much, but Jesus does not budge from His position. We then read:

After this many of his disciples turned back and no longer walked with him. ~ John 6:66 

Today, talk about Jesus’ deity and exclusivity; talk about the cross, repentance and renouncing of sin, holy living, and sound theology. Furthermore, take out the lights, the programs, and excitement, and watch the masses turn away. Mind you, this does not necessarily mean people will stop attending church. We are forewarned,

For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions, and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander off into myths. ~ 2 Timothy 4:3-4

When the Gospel message begins calling you to turn from sin, to deny yourself, and to surrender unto Christ wholeheartedly, do you continue to follow and pursue Christ or do you, at this point, turn back and no longer walk with Him?