A Threat to Those Previously Immortal?

I am neither critical of those who are vaccinated nor of those who are not. However, I am critical of hypocritical politicians who try to tell the public how deathly serious covid is, and try to set up mandates that do not apply to them and their social lives. I am critical of the administrators and the press that seek to propagate fear, yet are perfectly fine with (and silent about) opening borders and welcoming persons, even transporting some place to place, although some have covid and are not mandated to be quarantined. Understand, my point has nothing to do with immigration, but rather, there are questions every American, regardless of differing views, ought to be asking a corrupt government that speaks out of both sides of its mouth.

I am also critical of the way some have become irrationally fearful of this virus. Mind you, I’m not saying it isn’t serious. But I know of people who are so afraid that they are fearful to go out, who are critical of those who aren’t vaccinated—to the point those who aren’t vaccinated find no welcoming into their homes. “People are dying from this stuff,” they say. What? Were we a bunch of immortals before covid? Did covid somehow bring about death, something we knew nothing about previously? Yes, the virus is serious. Yes, people have died. But are people dying all around us like bugs who were just visited by the Orkin man?

“But man, covid kills people!” So do gangs in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles, but these are still thriving cities. So does influenza, but it isn’t feared like covid. So does heart disease, but McDonald’s is still a thriving business. And so do drunk drivers, but there’s no outrage against others who choose to drink.

Indeed, if covid was like a virus that created raging, irrational zombies like we see in movies, by all means, get vaccinated and stock up on ammo. But this isn’t the reality of covid. No, don’t treat it lightly, but don’t lose your head or your freedoms because of it. 

Does covid kill people! Yes, in some cases. But I hate to break it to you, but we were never mortal before this. Whether we catch covid or not, we are going to die someday, somehow, so stop behaving stupidly over this. Whether you are vaccinated or not makes no difference to me. But if you know you have it, don’t be stupid, stay away from others. If you’re older and have enjoyed your life, stop being critical of your children and grandchildren if they refuse to be vaccinated. They have every right to be suspicious as to why a government is so eager to get everyone vaccinated, to the point of bribing and threatening. Are you so self-preoccupied with yourselves you don’t care about them? Will there prove to be detrimental effects ten or twenty years down the road? On the flip side, don’t criticize those who get vaccinated. This, too, is a right and privilege. 

More than anything, ask more questions. I do not have the answers to covid. All I know is over the last several years, more and more people are checking their brains at the door, mindlessly trusting a government filled with liars having a lust for money and power, bringing forth nothing but division and chaos to a people they’re supposed to represent and defend. There is so much conflicting information concerning covid and threats against some of our personal and Constitutional freedoms. How disgraceful, regardless of affiliations, to behave like stupid children following the tune of the Pied Piper.

[Note: Do not assume either I have or haven’t been vaccinated based on this article. The truth might or might not surprise you. I could disclose, but it isn’t anyone’s business, just as it’s none of mine if you have or haven’t.]

Unchained, but Still Bound

People often view liberty as freedom from all restraints. For example, in the Scriptures we read,

The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord and against his Anointed, saying, “Let us burst their bonds apart and cast away their cords from us.” ~ Psalm 2:2-3

However, in the New Testament we read of a poor fellow who dwelt among the tombs, driven by the demonic:

And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. ~ Mark 5:3-5

Many today boast of their “freedom” as they cast off all restraints, all the while bound tightly and oppressed by their vices, addictions, and shame. However, just as it was true for the man in the tombs, so Jesus can also heal people of such miseries today. You can know genuine freedom through Him if you will but cry out to Him in faith.

The Emotionally Cancerous Choice and Its Path to Healing

Each of us have been hurt, betrayed, or abused by another at some point in time. This comes with being human, living among other humans, in a fallen world. Nevertheless, the manner in which we handle and respond to our hurts, betrayals, and abuses is vital.  Our immediate emotion is anger. This is a natural response—especially if the wrong done was neither provoked or justified. However, to hold onto anger and the unwillingness to forgive is injurious to one’s own wellbeing.

“Why should I forgive him? He does not deserve forgiveness! I will never forgive him!” How often such words are spoken with gritted teeth. Yet, such words reveal great misunderstanding. Forgiveness is not about letting a person off the hook and acting as though the offense had never happened; rather, it is the freeing one’s own self from a self-imposed prison, and finding healing from an emotional cancer that will grow. As for not deserving, none of us deserves forgiveness, but each of us need it.

The emotional cancer resulting from an unwillingness to forgive can affect a person’s relationship with others—especially if the bitterness towards the unforgiven one is constantly vomited onto others. The refusal to forgive will also strangle inner joy. However, the most detrimental aspect of stubbornly refusing to forgive another is the way it affects one’s ability to hear and relate to God. Here, the pretense of religion can be very deceiving, because a person can believe he is in good standing with God, but completely oblivious to the warnings of the Scriptures.

Jesus says,

But if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. ~ Matthew 6:15 (ESV)

Then his master summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me.  And should not you have had mercy on your fellow servant, as I had mercy on you?’ And in anger his master delivered him to the jailers, until he should pay all his debt. So also my heavenly Father will do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother from your heart.” ~ Matthew 18:32-35

The apostle John writes:

Everyone who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him. ~ 1 John 3:15

So, as one can see, forgiveness has much to do with the wellbeing of the one who had been offended. But let’s be honest, many of us have permitted the emotional cancer of resentment to eat away at us. Some who are reading this probably still have not had it “treated.” If we would be healed, then we must be willing to forgive. This form of “chemo” is no easier than the physical kind.

So how does one begin to forgive?

  1. Be honest about the offense and the hurt, as well as the possibility of the perpetrator not being honest about the offense. Your healing is not for the perpetrator but for you. Be honest with God about your feelings, anger, hatred, disgust, shame, etc. Be honest with Him about the pain and turmoil you feel, and take the time to cry.
  2. Ask God for the courage, grace, and ability to extend forgiveness. This might need to be prayed several times. Yet, this process will help flush out some of the infection, so to speak. As you experience the anger, ill-will, etc., confess these. John writes, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).
  3. Be open and willing to forgive, and leave any judgment in God’s hands. Allow yourself to heal and to move on.
  4. Try not to dwell on the offense. Living through it is quite enough; there is no need to keep reliving it in your mind.
  5. Repeat the steps as needed.

Forgiveness tends to feel counterintuitive, but it really is for the emotional and spiritual health of the forgiver. To refuse to forgive only permits the emotional cancer to grow and spread. Forgiveness and letting go is the only cure. It seems like a cruel irony: the refusal to forgive will not harm the person the grudge is held against, but will cripple and destroy the one holding the grudge. Your willingness to forgive is not for the benefit of the one who hurt you, the benefit is for you. Do yourself well—forgive. You are worth it!